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2006 Plains Region Harvest Aid Guide
(100kb)Provided by the Texas Cooperative Extension to assist producers with determining crop maturity, the selection and application of harvest-aid chemicals, insect management, preventing lint contamination, and general harvest considerations.
Updated: 9/13/2006
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Boll Weevil
(227 kb) The boll weevil is a serious pest for cotton farmers across the country. A boll weevil is actually a beetle that is approximately one-fourth of an inch in length that feeds on cotton buds and flowers, which can destroy the plants if left unattended.
Updated: 6/20/2007
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By-products
(730kb) By-products from the production and ginning of cotton have long been associated with the cotton industry. Through experimentation and research, farmers and ginners have sought ways to turn what seemed like useless trash or leftovers into usable, beneficial and profitable products.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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COBY
(518kb) COBY (short for cotton by-products) is a value-added version of cotton by-products currently being researched and developed at the USDA-ARS station in Lubbock, Texas.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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Cottonseed
(519kb) Cottonseed is simply the seed produced from the cotton plant. It is located within the cotton bowl along with the cotton fibers. It is removed from the fiber during the ginning process and has become the most profitable by-product of the cotton plant.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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Cottonseed Oil
(518kb) Cottonseed oil is the edible, usually pale yellow oil extracted from cottonseed. Before the 1940s, cottonseed was the main source of vegetalbe oil available. Today, it is third behind soybean and corn oil. It is gaining in popularity however, becuase of its widespread availability and seemingly endless supply.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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Gin Trash
(474kb) Gin trash is composed of the burrs, leaves, stalks and other residue of the plant, seeds, twigs and dirt left at the gin after the cotton has been processed.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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Harvest
(224 kb) Harvesting is an important part in the life of cotton. Traditionally done by hand, cotton is now harvested using mechanical means. As the technology of these methods improve, so does the efficiency of harvesting.
Updated: 6/20/2007
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Linters
(508kb) Linters are the remaining fibers (lint) on the cotton seed after it has been processed at the gin. These linters can be made into a variety of useful products and have proven to be beneficial in a number of ways.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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Pesticide Application
Pesticides (including insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) are used to control and reduce the damage done to plants by pests, insects, and weeds. They contain a variety of chemicals and are used in a variety of applications.
Updated: 7/5/2007
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Planting
(227kb) Planting is a very important aspect of a cotton farmer’s life. It is the first step toward growing the most wide-spread cash crop in Texas. If not planted within a specific window of time, farmers may not receive the yields they anticipate or may not be covered by important crop insurance policies.
Updated: 6/20/2007
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Southwest Council of Agribusiness
(537kb)The alliance of agricultural organizations, financial institutions and businesses was announced on September 7, 2006 at the First Ag Credit building in Lubbock, TX with a common goal of extending the 2002 Farm Bill
Updated: 9/13/2006
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Stalks
(709kb) Once farmers have removed their cotton from the field, they are left with fields filled with the bare stems of cotton plants. They contain little or no leaves and some residual cotton and were usually plowed back into the soil until an alternative use was discovered.
Updated: 9/8/2006
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Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Foundation (TBWEF)
(163kb) The boll weevil is the most consistent threat to cotton. This tutorial contains a general description of the Foundation and the eradacation program.
Updated: 9/13/2006
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Understanding the Farm Problem: Six Common Errors
(186KB)"This research paper is intended to both highlight some of the common errors in depicting the farm sector and present a more accurate image of family farming in the United States." by Timothy Wise, Global Development and Environment Institute. -Released March 2005
Updated: 9/13/2006
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